Black Stone Beach, Whirinaki

The Mana Ahuriri Trust have today extended the Rāhui they have placed on Te Whanga a Ruawharo – Hawke Bay, to include the coast from the  Moko ‘Te Awa o Mokotūāraro (Clive River) right around to the Mohaka River mouth.

A spokesperson for the Trust, Parris Greening told BayBuzz that the Rāhui includes a ban on fishing, kaimoana gathering and all recreational water activities such as boating, surfing and swimming for at least 10 days from 19 February.

“Due to the recent Cyclone Gabrielle and the disturbance to our whenua, Tangata whenua are still recovering tūpāpaku (bodies of the deceased) from the Tangaroa.

“We also believe kōiwi (human skeletal remains) from flooded urupā have been carried through the floods on the rivers to sea.”

Both Ngāti Kahungunu Iwi Incorporated and the Hawke`s Bay Regional Council support this rāhui.

Mana Ahuriri Trust Chairperson, Tania Eden formally asks the Hawke’s Bay public “to respect our wishes and hereby set this Rāhui. A notice of removal will be posted in the coming days.”

The coast beyond  ‘Te Awa o Mokotūāraro including Haumoana, Te Awanga and around to Clifton, Ocean Beach and Waimarama are not part of the Rāhui.

For more information and updates see:  https://www.facebook.com/manaahuriritrust Ngā mihi 

Public Interest Journalism funded through NZ On Air.

Share



Join the Conversation

2 Comments

  1. Could you please re-write this article, so 100% of our population can read it? Perhaps provide a full English version as well as a full Te Reo version, so we at least have a choice of which version to read & understand. I do not begrudge reading or learning an alternative language, however in a situation as sensitive as this is, affecting ALL New Zealanders, more so, the citizens of Hawkes Bay & Gisborne, who’ve lost loved ones regardless of skin colour, “English” is the language we’ve been taught through our lifetime to date, not Te Reo. We’ve all had the choice to learn Te Reo & while I’m currently learning it, to mingle the English with Te Reo to such an extent as shown in this article, presents an extremely difficult article in which to read, it doesn’t flow, nor does it provide for the English equivalent in wording. . “Many” will “choose” not to read it, which then defeats your efforts with your notification or request to not swim or fish. I don’t see this as disrespectful, as I understand the actual point you’re making, however many “will” feel disrespected while reading it & therefore won’t.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *